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Congressman Kennedy Takes Questions on Taxes, Immigration

Newly seated U.S. Rep. Joseph Kennedy III was the speaker at a business lunch organized by the Milford Area Chamber of Commerce.

Four weeks into his term, U.S. Rep. Joseph Kennedy stopped in Milford Monday, addressing an audience of business owners and managers at a luncheon arranged by the Milford Area Chamber of Commerce.

Although his time for questions was limited, Kennedy addressed some concerns expressed about immigration and tax policy. Kennedy later in the day was expected to tour the Seven Hills Foundation center on Cedar Street.

In the lunch forum, at Doubletree by Hilton Hotel, Kennedy said he will support simpler tax policies that allow businesses to succeed. "Our national budget woes are having a dire consequence at the local level. Businesses big and small across this district say the same thing. Uncertainty over our fiscal future continues to choke off our recovery."

A bipartisan plan that tackles the budget deficit is needed, he said.

When people had an opportunity to ask questions, Kennedy was asked by one businessman to explain why the government taxes businesses "to death" while allowing others, including immigrants, to seek free services. "Instead of taxing people to death, why don't we cut the taxes, and allow these businesses to move forward?" said the businessman.

Kennedy, in responding to his concerns about immigrants, responded that Congress is close to reaching consensus on common pillars of an immigration policy. It is almost as complex, and as voluminous, as the federal tax code, he said.

"It's extraordinarily difficult to understand," Kennedy said. In Congressional briefings after he entered office, he said, he asked immigration policy analysts "how long the wait could be for someone trying to enter the country legally, and the experts responded: longer than you're going to be alive. I'm 32. If it's going to take somebody 70 years to get into the system, to do it legally, that's not a functional system."

Ann Sherry, a senior vice president at Charles River Bank, a Medway-based institution with four locations, asked Kennedy if he would be an advocate for community banks. "We were not the ones who did bad things," she said. "We are the lifeblood of our communities. We are seeing the burden of regulations coming our way and we are hoping we have an advocate in you."

Kennedy said regulations could be re-examined to make them more effective, and target issues appropriately. But he said what is created should remain strong. "To make sure we don't create the circumstances for another risk." 

Dave Francis February 11, 2013 at 11:50 PM
The Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) announced the results of a national survey that found 52 percent of likely voters want illegal aliens to their home countries. Only 33 percent preferred they be given legal status. The results, which were published in a new CIS report, are based on polling conducted by Pulse Opinion Research. “Poll wording matters. Most post-election polls on immigration policy have given the public the false choice of conditional legalization or mass deportations. This poll uses neutral wording that allows us to know the views of the American public,” said Steven Camarota, CIS’ Director of Research. “With border security and the enforcement of immigration laws being a key issue with legislators, the fact that 70 percent of those polled were not confident that immigration law would be enforced if there is legalization and 69 percent believed providing legal status to illegal’s would encourage more illegal immigration is a good indicator of public sentiment.” Among the findings of the survey: Of those who want illegal immigrants to return home, 73 percent said that they felt “very strongly” about their view, while just 35 percent of those who support a legalization said they felt very strongly about their view;
Dave Francis February 11, 2013 at 11:51 PM
One reason the public may prefer that illegal aliens go home is a strong belief that immigration laws have not been enforced — 64 percent said that enforcement of immigration laws has been “too little”, while just 10 percent said that it had been too much, and 15 percent said it was “just right”; When asked why there is a large illegal population, voters overwhelming (71 percent) thought it was because we had not made a real effort to enforce our immigration laws. Only 18 percent said it was because we didn’t allow in enough legal immigrants; About two-thirds of voters (69 percent) agreed with the statement that “giving legal status to illegal immigrants does not solve the problem because rewarding law breaking will only encourage more illegal immigration.” Just 26 percent disagreed; Only 27 percent of voters expressed confidence that immigration laws would be enforced in the event of a legalization, while 70 percent said they were not confident that laws would be enforced; and 53 percent said they would be more likely to support a political party that supports immigration law enforcement while 32 percent indicated that they would be more likely to support a party that supports legalization.
Joe Kane February 12, 2013 at 05:53 PM
"It's extraordinarily difficult to understand," Kennedy said. In Congressional briefings after he entered office, he said, he asked immigration policy analysts "how long the wait could be for someone trying to enter the country legally, and the experts responded: longer than you're going to be alive. I'm 32. If it's going to take somebody 70 years to get into the system, to do it legally, that's not a functional system." PLEEEAAAASSSSSEEEEEE!! Did Mr. Kennedy offer any real-life examples of people that took 70 years to go through the process to enter this country leagally? I don't think so!! But rest assured, there will be people out there who will believe this crap!! It certainly didn't take Mr. Kennedy long to learn how to shovel it on did it??!!

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